Tag Archives: photography

Flotsam

By David Wiesner
Published by Clarion, 2011
This wordless picture book tells the tale of a young boy who goes to the beach with his family and collects treasures that he finds washed upon the shore. When an antique camera washes ashore, the boy develops the film inside, to find a treasury of self-portaits, each holding the portrait of the person before them. The boy continues the journey of the camera, takes his own photo, and throws the camera back to the whims of the sea.
This amazing book is great for middle and upper elementary students studying the ocean. Also a great wordless book for creating one’s own dialogue for the story.
Awards: Caldecott Medal
Accessed: Augusta County Library

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Knuffle Bunny, Too

By Mo Willems

Published by Hyperion Books for Children, 2007

Trixie is very excited.  This is the day that she is bringing Knuffle Bunny to school with her.  But Trixie is in for a surprise when she finds out that another classmate has a knuffle bunny JUST LIKE HERS!  All day, the girls squabble, and eventually both bunnies get taken away.  At the end of the day, they get them back and go home– until at 2:30 in the morning, Trixie realizes that the knuffle bunny she has isn’t hers.  The OTHER GIRL has it and SHE NEEDS IT BACK!  After a middle-of-the-night trade-off, the girls realize that they have more in common than they thought, and they become friends.

This book could be used to identify conflict and resolution as well as setting (the photos are brilliant), characterization, and plot.

Awards:  This is the sequel to the Caldecott-Honor-winning Knuffle Bunny.

Accessed: Augusta County Library

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Flotsam

By David Weisner

Published by Clarion Books, 2006

On a day at the beach, a young boy discovers a submersible camera in the waves, develops the film inside, and sees not only mysterious images of the down-deep, but also pictures of all the children who have ever discovered the camera.  It is apparent they have all done what he has done, because all of them are holding a picture of the former child, who is holding a picture of the child before that, and so on.  The boy throws the camera back in the water and the book ends with its next discoverer picking the camera up out of the waves.

This book is wordless, which almost always lends itself to being a great book to talk about the value of images in telling a story.  It also invites a re-read, because the details in the images are what make the book come alive.  This book is written by the same author of the Caldecott-winning Tuesday.

Awards: School Library Journal Starred Review

Accessed: Augusta County Library

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized